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A single dollar bill can take you a mile or it can take you 600 of them. The difference is in how fast or slow you travel, the purpose of your trip, and how much work you have to put into the journey. Here are a couple of examples. Recently, I took an Uber from a semi-rural community west of Boise, Idaho some 22 miles to a modern and popular shopping area called The Village. The drive took about 30 minutes in a silver Dodge Grand Caravan. It cost me some idle conversation and a little more than $37.00. That same week, I took my EVELO Galaxy TT electric bike on a meandering December ride. I crossed over a set of railroad tracks (it was in the 40s and clear so they weren’t too slippery); stopped at a lonely thrift store with lots of small glass figurines that reminded me of Michael Rooker’s character from the Guardians of the Galaxy; and went into a pub to warm my hands. The journey (stops included) took a couple of hours and cost me much less than a dollar for the electricity that helped to power my electric bike. I mention these two trips because they represent two transportation extremes in terms of cost. And, perhaps, they can set the stage for our premise. How far can you travel for one dollar in fuel? In 2014, EVELO published its first article about the power of $1. That post compared six modes of transportation and looked at the relative energy cost (fuel cost) for each mode.
Mode of Travel Energy Source Distance Traveled
Car 1/4 of a gallon of gas 5 miles
Public Transit About 2/5 of a fare (NYC) 6 miles
Motorcycle 1/4 of a gallon of gas 12.5 miles
Hybrid Car 1/4 of a gallon of gas 13.5 miles
Scooter 1/4 of a gallon of gas 21 miles
EVELO Electric Bicycle 13 recharges 200-500 miles
  The original electric bike data came from EVELO co-founder, Boris Mordkovich, who took a pair of electric bicycles across the United States in 2012. Mordkovich’s journey started in New York City and covered 4,000 miles over two months en route to San Francisco. Mordkovish averaged 250-to-500 miles per change during the ride. What follows is an update of this data.

$1 Will Take You 9 Miles in an Automobile

For more than five decades, the American Automobile Association (AAA) or “Triple A,” has been reporting the cost of owning an automobile in the United States. The AAA's assessment includes the average fuel cost per mile. In 2018, cars and trucks typically cost about 11.05 cents per mile for fuel. Put another way, the average automobile will go about 9.04 miles for one dollar.
Mode of Travel How Far You Can Go for $1 in Fuel
Average Car 9.04 miles
  Some American drivers can do much better. The 11.05 cents per mile cost described above is an average fuel cost across all automobile types. If an automobile owner chooses to drive a more efficient car, the cost can be considerably less. Here is a break down for the nine automobile categories the AAA considered.
Mode of Travel How Far You Can Go for $1 in Fuel
Average Car 9.04 miles
Small Sedan 12.48 miles
Medium Sedan 10.89 miles
Large Sedan 8.2 miles
Small SUV (FWD) 10.96 miles
Medium SUV (4WD) 8.04 miles
Minivan 8.42 miles
1/2 ton Pickup (4WD) 6.64 miles
Hybrid Automobile 17.54 miles
Electric Automobile 22.17 miles
 

$1 Will Take You About 23 Miles on a Motorcycle

The AAA data gave us a great start for automobiles, but as we look at motorcycles, we are going to need to do a little work on our own. First, the U.S. national average selling price for gasoline was $2.32 per gallon the week of December 24, 2018, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. We can use that number for our fuel cost. Second, we need a model for our miles per gallon estimates. For this, I used a 2019 Honda CB650R, which gets about 53 miles to the gallon. With a little math, we learn that each mile costs about 4.37 cents on a motorcycle.
$2.32 ÷ 53 = 0.0437
  When we divide our $1 (100 cents) by the 4.37 cent average, we find that a motorcycle can take us about 22.88 miles for $1.  
Mode of Travel How Far You Can Go for $1 in Fuel
Average Car 9.04 miles
Small Sedan 12.48 miles
Medium Sedan 10.89 miles
Large Sedan 8.2 miles
Small SUV (FWD) 10.96 miles
Medium SUV (4WD) 8.04 miles
Minivan 8.42 miles
1/2 ton Pickup (4WD) 6.64 miles
Hybrid Automobile 17.54 miles
Electric Automobile 22.17 miles
Motorcycle 22.88 miles
 

$1 Will Take You About 43 Miles on a Scooter

Using a similar method, I estimated how far a buck would take you on a 2019 Vespa Primavera 150cc scooter averaging 98 miles to the gallon.
$2.32 ÷ 98 = 0.0237
  At a mere 2.37 cents per mile, a fun-to-ride 150cc scooter like the Vespa Primavera would take you about 43.1 miles for just a dollar in fuel.  
Mode of Travel How Far You Can Go for $1 in Fuel
Average Car 9.04 miles
Small Sedan 12.48 miles
Medium Sedan 10.89 miles
Large Sedan 8.2 miles
Small SUV (FWD) 10.96 miles
Medium SUV (4WD) 8.04 miles
Minivan 8.42 miles
1/2 ton Pickup (4WD) 6.64 miles
Hybrid Automobile 17.54 miles
Electric Automobile 22.17 miles
Motorcycle 22.88 miles
Scooter 43.1 miles
 

$1 Will Take you 628 Miles on an Electric Bike

The final mode of transportation to consider is an electric bike. “An electric bicycle is, first and foremost, a bicycle. It uses the same designs, geometries, and components as any other bicycle, but also includes an added electric motor, fueled by a rechargeable battery, which gives riders an extra boost of power, ultimately providing a smoother, more convenient, and less strenuous cycling experience” according to “The Complete Electric Bike Buyer’s Guide.” We have two considerations when it comes to estimating how far a single dollar will take you on an electric bike. First, the “fuel” is electricity stored in a battery, so we need to estimate how much electricity it takes to charge an electric bike battery. Next, the range for an electric bike can be tricky to estimate, since the rider can pedal, extending how far the electric bike will go.

Calculate Electric Bike Battery Capacity in Watt Hours

To help determine how much energy it takes to charge an electric bike, let’s consider the EVELO Delta X. It uses a 48 volt, 11.6 amp hour Samsung battery with an estimated range of about 45 miles. The cost of electricity in the United States is typically measured in cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh), so we need to figure out the Delta X battery’s power in watts by multiplying its volts by its amp hours.
48 volts X 11.6 amp hours = 556.8 watt-hours (Wh)
  Thus, the battery will hold a little more than half of a kWh on a single charge. In October 2018, the average cost of a kWh of electricity was 12.87 cents in the United States, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. To figure out how much it would cost to charge the Delta X battery, we first divide 12.87 cents by 1,000 watt-hours (a kWh is 1,000 Wh). Then we multiply the result by the battery’s 556.8 watt-hour potential.
12.87 cents / 1,000 watt hours X 556.8 watt hours = 7.16 cents
  It costs 7.16 cents to completely charge the Delta X battery.

Estimating Electric Bike Range

As a company, EVELO sells class 2 electric bikes that feature both pedal assistance and a throttle. These bikes are among the best choices for transportation since they allow you to pedal as much as you like, without leaving you worn out or forcing you to arrive at work sweaty and frumpy looking. A class 2 electric bike’s range can also vary greatly. At the beginning of this article, I told you about a short December trip I took on my EVELO Galaxy TT. It was a purely recreational ride. I had the bike’s pedal assist level set to five, meaning my electric bike was giving me a significant amount of help as it proportionally added power to each pedal stroke. At one point in the ride, I was ascending a relatively steep incline, so I applied the throttle. My range would have been significantly different than someone riding a similar bike with relatively less pedal assistance or without using the throttle. Consider this electric bike testimonial from EVELO customer Steve Brown. “They do a Georgia Century Ride here where they actually close Georgia 400 down, which is a major expressway,” Brown said. “You get to choose from a nine-mile ride, a 22-mile ride, a 45-mile ride, a 62-mile ride, or a hundred-mile ride, and I did the 62-mile ride on the Delta and still had battery juice left over because I did a lot of the work myself because I wanted a really good workout.” Here is the point, for our comparison, we will use the Delta X’s specified range of 45 miles, which is based on using an average level of pedal assist over average terrain. But we need to remember that an electric bike’s range varies greatly. Brown could have gone far further than 45 miles on a single charge if he pedaled as he did for the Georgia Century Ride, but I might not have gone as far.

Establishing the Cost Per Mile for an Electric Bike

So far we know that it costs about 7.16 cents to charge the electric bike and that the bike will travel about 45 miles per charge. Thus, to get a cost per mile, we need to divide 7.16 cents by 45.
$0.0716 ÷ 45 = 0.00159
  This calculation gives us a figure of 0.159 cents per mile, meaning an electric bike will take you approximately 628.93 miles.
Mode of Travel How Far You Can Go for $1 in Fuel
Average Car 9.04 miles
Small Sedan 12.48 miles
Medium Sedan 10.89 miles
Large Sedan 8.2 miles
Small SUV (FWD) 10.96 miles
Medium SUV (4WD) 8.04 miles
Minivan 8.42 miles
1/2 ton Pickup (4WD) 6.64 miles
Hybrid Automobile 17.54 miles
Electric Automobile 22.17 miles
Motorcycle 22.88 miles
Scooter 43.1 miles
Electric Bike 628.93 miles
Slippery roads, biting wind, and low visibility can make biking in the rain more challenging than a sunny-day ride. But, in most cases, a few drops of rain shouldn’t stop you from touring the countryside, commuting, or simply enjoying your electric bike. Imagine it is a Friday afternoon and you’re having lunch with friends at Naam Thai Cuisine on 34th Avenue between Pike and Union in Seattle. The day started relatively sunny for Seattle in December and your EVELO Delta X electric bike is chained up just outside. Just as your yellow curry with tofu arrives at the table, the weather turns, and a steady drizzle begins to fall. After lunch (which included an extra order of rangoons), you have a choice. You can abandon your bike and Uber back to the office or you can ride your electric bike in the rain. You choose the latter. Rain isn’t going to stop you. This is especially true if you have taken time to prepare your electric bike, yourself, and your gear for rainy rides before clouds appear. Do this and you should be able to avoid getting cold, wet, chaffed, or worst of all broken.

Tip No. 1: Use Fenders

Electric bikes, like their conventional cousins, are generally resistant to rain. The drivetrain will survive splashes. The battery won’t fail because of raindrops alone. But that doesn’t mean that you want to spray water and debris from the road all over yourself and your electric bike’s many and various components. Simply put, if you are a bicycle commuter or if you know you’re going to be riding in regions prone to rain, you will want fenders.
Image of.an EVELO Electric Bike with fenders that will help to protect you when you ride in the rain. Fenders will keep rain off of you and your bike.
 

Tip No. 2: Weatherproof Yourself

“The hardest part about riding in wet or cold weather is taking the first pedal stroke. Once you actually get riding, it's not so bad,” said David Dye, an agent with EVELO’s industry-leading customer service team. “At its most basic, you need to stay warm. Staying dry definitely contributes to that as well, but I find it less important.” Dye recommends starting with a hat. “A cycling cap has just enough of a brim to keep rain out of your eyes so you can still see, but also fits under your helmet. Get a wool one when it's cold; bonus points for ear flaps.” Next up, you’ll want gloves. “Gloves are so important that I will take a spare pair if I know I'm going to be out for a long time or if it's raining really hard,” Dye said. Look for good quality water-resistant gloves that will keep your hands warm and dry. Popular materials include Gore-tex or in extreme cases neoprene. Your rain-resistant jacket or coat should strike a balance between keeping you warm and making you sweaty. You may even want to consider layering fleece, wool, polyester, or bamboo-based viscose fabrics so that you can vent or remove layers as conditions change. Add rain pants or waterproof shoes to make the ride even more comfortable.

Tip No. 3: Weatherproof Your Stuff

Let’s imagine a hypothetical ride. It’s Saturday, and you decide to head downtown and check out some of the second-hand stores. At one place you find a pastel suit jacket that reminds you of Don Johnson in Miami Vice. Another store has a vintage lava lamp you can’t live without, but the real find is a dusty box of records in a consignment shop. You discover a nearly perfect copy Curtis Fuller’s the Opener on Blue Note Records. It’s worth about $3,100 in mint condition. You buy it for a measly $20, put it in a canvas bag, and start the ride home. That is when the rain falls. The point is clear, you want to be able to keep your stuff dry when you ride wet, whether that stuff is a classic vinyl record, a paperback novel, or your laptop. For many electric bike riders, the best choice will be seam-sealed waterproof pannier bag, backpack, or shoulder bag. It can also be a good idea to have a few ziplock bags on hand. A small laptop will fit in a large freezer bag. An iPhone or Android fits in a typical sandwich bag.

Tip No. 4: Use Lights

When you ride your electric bike in the rain, you are sharing roads with lots of other vehicles. There are cars, trucks, vans, and buses. In some cities, there will be plenty of other cyclists and lots of folks on Lime or Bird scooters. Each traveler is also dealing with the challenges of driving, riding, or otherwise getting around in the rain. Among these challenges is visibility and having lights will help. In fact, in many places, the law requires you to have lights on your electric bike in the rain. Typically, you will want a front facing white light bright enough that it can be seen at least 500 feet away. Aim this headlight straight ahead. You will also want a red tail light that can be seen from about 500 or 600 feet. To these, consider adding a blinking light on your helmet, rack, handlebars, or pannier bags.

Tip No. 5: Lower Tire Pressure

Many experienced cyclists, including those on electric bikes, adjust tire pressure to match road conditions. “On new pavement, your tires might feel great at 100 psi, but on a rough road, they might roll faster at 90 psi,” wrote Lee McCormack and Joe Lindsey in an August 2018 Bicycling article. “In wet conditions, you may want to run 10 psi less than usual for improved traction.” The idea is simple. The somewhat lower tire pressure allows more of the tire to come into contact with the road, thereby, giving your electric bike a better grip.

Tip No. 6: Slow Down

Riding in the rain can be invigorating. Perhaps, it is the cool drops on your skin. Or maybe you instinctively understand that riding harder and faster actually keeps you warmer. But in each case, you want to try to avoid going too fast when you ride your electric bike in the rain. Wet roads and somewhat worse visibility can mean that you won’t have as much time to react. This can actually be more true on an ebike than on a conventional bicycle, since electric bikes with pedal-assist and power-on-demand capabilities have the potential to maintain higher average speeds in all weather conditions. So here is your tip, take a bit more time. Ride a little slower and more carefully when you ride an electric bike in the rain.

Tip No. 7: Brake Early

Closely related to slowing down when you ride an ebike in wet weather is taking more time when you brake. You will want to slow down gradually. “The purpose of adding a motor to an electric bike is to give riders an additional source of power. Most electric bikes allow riders to control when the motor kicks in and how much power it provides. This makes possible a wide scope of riding options ranging from fully leg-powered pedaling, a combination of pedaling and motor assistance, and fully motorized riding, allowing the cyclist to fine tune her riding experience to meet her specific needs and demands,” wrote the authors of the “The Complete Electric Bike Buyer’s Guide.” The additional power an electric bike provides requires better braking systems, and it turns out that this is a distinct advantage over some conventional bikes in the rain. Many electric bikes include disc brakes rather than the rim brakes often found on conventional bicycles. Disc brakes, almost by definition, perform far better in the rain. Add to your more powerful braking system some caution and early braking and you should experience a safe ride even in a downpour. Just remember that you need to brake early when you ride an electric bike in the rain.

Tip No. 8: Don’t Lean into Corners

Electric bikes are fun to ride. The extra power can dramatically improve the riding experience. Even a bike commuter in a suit can feel a little like a professional rider hitting the corners hard. But you won’t want to channel pro cyclists like Alejandro Valverde Belmonte, Peter Sagan, or Tom Dumoulin when you corner in wet conditions. Instead, gradually brake as you come toward a corner. Choose a line that lets you turn without leaning. Keep as much of the tire on the road as possible.

Tip No. 9: Look for Slippery Spots

When it rains, oil and gasoline comes to the surface. This can make familiar asphalt suddenly unpredictable. So look for slippery spots. You want to avoid puddles or standing water generally, but especially watch out for “rainbow” puddles since these can be full of slippery lubricants or fuel. Also avoid painted lines. Lane markers become especially slippery when it rains. Metal grates and covers are like ice, so definitely avoid them. Finally, watch for debris. Something as seemingly safe as fallen leaves can be a slipping hazard when you ride your electric bike in the rain.

Tip No. 10: Clean Your Electric Bike After You Ride

After your rainy ride, be sure to take a few minutes to clean and dry your electric bike. An ebike can be a very cost effective and efficient form of transportation. It works well for recreational riding, basic transportation, or serious commuting. But it does need maintenance, and simply taking the time to clean and dry it after a wet ride can significantly increases its longevity.
A folding electric bike is a great choice for commuters, travelers, RV owners, or anyone who wants an easy to store, easy to move transportation option. Imagine you are a commuter in the San Francisco Bay Area. Let’s say you start your day with a 15-minute drive to the El Cerrito Del Norte Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station on Cutting Boulevard. You pull your folding bike out of the trunk, flip it together, and roll it onto the 7:16 AM train toward San Francisco. Some 32 minutes later you arrive at the Embarcadero station on Market Street. You head down Market and take a left on Beale Street. It’s one way and the traffic can be heavy. Your office is just past Philz Coffee near Folsom Street. You roll your bike in the side door, take the elevator to your floor, and push it right up to your desk. Your folded electric bike fits nice and secure in the corner of your cubicle until it is time to head home. This is just one possible scenario. If you live in a small apartment or a tiny house; or if you own an RV or a boat you can think of plenty of times when a folding electric bike would make exploring or getting around a lot easier. If you think you want an folding ebike, the next question to ask is which one. As you look over all of the specifications and compare prices there are probably ten features you should be most concerned about.

Top 10 Features for a Folding Electric Bike

  1. Motor
  2. Throttle
  3. Folding
  4. Range
  5. Drivetrain
  6. Braking System
  7. Electronics
  8. Stem Height
  9. Tires
  10. Service and Warranty

Motor

The fundamental difference between an electric bike — folding or not — and a conventional bicycle is a motor. It is the defining characteristic, and for that reason, it is the most important feature to consider. A folding electric bike motor should provide the proper combination of power and value. It should help you climb hills, pedal through a national park, or commute to work without breaking a serious sweat. And it should achieve these goals without busting your budget since the motor can also be one of the most expensive components. Look for motors between 250 watts and 350 watts for folding electric bikes. This power range provides enough force to help you pedal in most situations. It also represents the most commonly available motors for folding electric bikes. You also want to look for motors that are a good value. For example, the 350-watt Bafang Max Drive motor is a “super quiet, mid-drive that measures pedal cadence as well as torque. It’s very smooth. It is one of my favorite sort of like value mid-drive motors,” said Court Rye, the author of, “A Practical Guide to Electric Bikes (Discovering Electric Bikes),” in a video review of the EVELO Quest Max folding electric bike. “There are out there. You know Bosch and Brose, Yahama, Shimano, but this Bafang motor is pretty great in my opinion. You know it is balancing price against functionality,” Rye said. https://youtu.be/WBQ868DEMUs?t=189 Motor placement is also important. Folding electric bikes may have a hub motor positioned in either the front or rear wheel or a mid-drive motor situated near the pedals (crankset). Hub motors may be less expensive, but provide relatively less force at the wheel than a mid-drive motor with similar wattage. “By directly powering the bike’s cranks, mid-drive motors work in tight coordination with the bike’s already existing gears, amplifying the mechanical advantage they provide. This becomes particularly helpful when it comes to climbing steep hills or navigating extended inclines,” wrote the authors of EVELO’s “The Complete Electric Bike Buyers Guide.”

Throttle

While almost all folding electric bikes assist you as you pedal, fewer offer a throttle that will power the bike without pedaling. This feature is extremely helpful for climbing hills or for covering relatively long distances. Look for a folding electric bike that gives you the opportunity to pedal when you want or just power through a hill or other challenging terrain.

Folding

A good folding electric bike should store easily and securely. That is after all the point. In fact, some of the main reasons to choose a folding electric bike include:
  • Living in a small home or apartment without the room to store a full-sized bicycle.
  • A mixed commute that combines cycling with a train ride, bus ride, or even a short drive.
  • Vacation travel since folding electric bikes easily fit in a typical RV or the trunk of a car.
An electric folding bike should be easy to fold and secure when it is folded. As an example, check out Pete Prebus’ demonstration of folding an electric bike in his review of the EVELO Quest Max. https://youtu.be/ZZvjU1blySc?t=716 Weight also plays a role in how well a folding electric bike, well, folds. Compared to conventional folding bicycles, a folding ebike is going to be heavy. The addition of the motor, battery, electronics, and related components adds weight quickly. So don’t be surprised if a good folding electric bike weighs in at 40 or 50 pounds.

Range

How far a folding electric bike can travel on a single charge depends on at least four factors, including battery size, battery efficiency, how much you pedal, and terrain. Put another way, “the range of the battery you need depends on the type of riding you plan on doing. If you plan to use more motor power than pedal power, then you’ll be using your battery’s charge quicker and will, therefore, need a larger range. If you plan to pedal a lot and use the motor assistance only periodically, you can probably use a battery with a smaller range,” according to chapter eight of the “The Complete Electric Bike Buyer’s Guide.” Court Rye, gives a nice demonstration of how pedal assistance impacts range in one of his Electric Bike Review reports. In that example, a folding electric bike with relatively little pedal assistance has a range of more than 40 miles while the same bike with more pedal assistance has a range closer to 25 miles. Also consider that an electric bike runs on a relatively large rechargeable battery, and if you ride your folding electric bike often charging is going to be the habit you cannot forget. It is common for an ebike battery to take about four hours to charge fully. If possible choose a bike with an easy to remove battery and store the battery at room temperature when not in use. For your folding electric bike look for batteries with around 9 or 10 amp hours. Often these batteries can conservatively provide around a 40-mile range without adding significant weight or cost.

Drivetrain

A traditional bicycle drivetrain can consist of several moving parts, including a crankset, cassette, chain, derailleurs, and shifters. Collectively, these components work to drive a bike forward. They also determine the relationship between how fast a rider pedals (cadence) and how rapidly the drive wheel turns. A bicycle in a relatively high gear could take more effort to pedal but would result in more drive-wheel rotation with each stroke. A conventional drivetrain, even in its most basic form (single speed, single gear ratio), can be effective for a folding electric bike. So don’t be concerned if an otherwise high-tech electric bike uses a conventional bicycle drivetrain. If the bike meets your needs and your budget, it can still be a very good option. If you want more, you could upgrade your folding electric bike’s drivetrain in at least two ways, adding a belt drive system and an internally-geared hub.
The upgraded EVELO Quest Max folding electric bike is a good example of what your drivetrain could be. Here you have the Gates Cardon Drive and the NuVinci CVT.
As an example, several EVELO electric bicycles — including the Quest Max folding ebike — use the Gates Carbon Drive belt system instead of a chain. This system provides a much smoother and quieter ride than a conventional chain drive. The Gates Carbon Drive is also clean since you won’t need to grease it. Finally, it is much more reliable, lasting much longer than a chain. The second upgrade is to add an internally-geared hub like the NuVinci continuously variable transmission. With this transmission, you don’t have specific gear steps, think first gear, second gear, etc. Rather, you have a nearly infinite number of “gears” between the low and high. The transmission always applies the best “gear” for the current riding condition. This is particularly helpful for an electric, mid-drive electric bike which can generate relatively more power and torque at the hub.

Braking System

Powerful folding electric bikes need equally powerful braking systems that automatically disengage the electric motor when you brake. When you choose a folding electric bike look for manual or hydraulic disc brakes, similar to the disc brakes available on several EVELO models. These heavy-duty brakes have the force needed to slow an ebike. You will also want motor inhibitors. These systems disengage the motor when you pull the brake handle so that you don’t have to fight against the powerful ebike motor. https://youtu.be/WBQ868DEMUs?t=225

Electronics

Good quality folding electric bikes will typically include an electronic instrument panel. This panel is the information hub for your ride. It should include information about speed and distance. Allow you to control the level of pedal assistance the bike’s motor is providing, and estimate the battery level and current range. (See an excellent example.)

Stem

This feature is for tall riders. Many folding electric bikes are lower to the ground than a standard bicycle or a standard electric bicycle. While this is important for many reasons, including a relatively lower stand-over height and a more compact outline when folded, it can also make a folding ebike feel pretty small — think clown bike in a Shriner’s parade small. To resolve this issue, look for folding electric bikes with long, adjustable or replaceable stems that bring the handlebars up to a comfortable height.

Tires

Folding bicycles don’t often include suspension or other forms of shock absorption. Thus, the ride can be somewhat less comfortable than a big, cushy cruiser. But tires can help. A relatively larger and more inflated tire can make for a comfortable riding folding electric bike. You can, of course, upgrade tires on your own too, but it is a really nice feature when your ebike had great tires from the start.

Service and Warranty

It may seem odd to include service as a top feature for a folding electric bike, but when you purchase an ebike you are starting a relationship. In the past, you probably had a favorite local bike shop. You could bring your bike in for a tune up, pick up a new chain, and even browse the latest models. Because of changes in retail economics, this may no longer be the case. There simply are fewer bike shops. Thus, most electric bikes are purchased online, direct from the bike maker. With this in mind choose a bike with an outstanding warranty and customer service.